Bakken Information Overload

For this month's issue, we had a layout logistics problem. Following the three-day Bakken event our team helped organize and produce content for, we were overwhelmed with story ideas, hard facts and info. Check it out here.
By Luke Geiver | September 15, 2015

For this month’s issue, we had a layout logistics problem. Following the three-day Bakken event our team helped organize and produce content for, we were overwhelmed with story ideas, hard facts and unique perspective. Our embarrassment of riches included beautiful imagery, complex charted information and recordings of multiple conversations suitable for individual feature stories. As you know, regarding the Bakken, there is a lot to read, write and talk about, and spending three days with experts and executives from oil producing firms, midstream entities and service companies—established or startup—is a great situation to be in, at least until it’s time to condense that information into anything  short of a Bakken documentary novel.

In “Exhibiting Bakken’s Mood,” on page 22, we wanted to capture the sentiment and takeaways from the July Bakken event held in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Patrick Miller accomplishes that in a special double feature ripe with images of speakers, lists of facts shared, charts explained and as the title indicates, moods felt about the state of the Bakken. His recap sheds light on several topics ranging from Continental Resource’s objective in fighting the U.S. crude oil export ban to future Bakken activity levels predicted by Houston-based energy analyst firms. The section on a multiwell pad project that suggests current setback limits in North Dakota are inappropriate was the topic of a blog written by our team the week after the event. If the print recap of the project generates anywhere near the interest it did online, I know our inboxes will be constantly dinging with requests for more information.

Mike Elliott, the main source in our look into shale play-based commercial and industrial real estate, is used to receiving requests for more information. His explanation of creating a shale play development timeline that compares one play to another was fascinating to learn about, and we’re confident everyone who picks up this issue will find it useful. Elliott also instilled confidence in us for the “Shale Play Real Estate” story simply by explaining his travel schedule to us––plus, we discovered our perspective in that story was spot on. When Elliott told us that he’s more than likely in a different energy hub city—Houston, Calgary, Willison—every week to talk with clients and assess the market in each location, we knew we were lucky to have caught him between flights and to have had the chance to bring valuable insight to life in a story. Enjoy the overload of information this month.

Luke Geiver
Editor
The Bakken magazine
lgeiver@bbiinternational.com